glass

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The Glass Pumpkin Patch


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This year’s pumpkinpatch event promises to be the best yet. We have a broad range of colors and sizes to choose from.

Selection will be much greater this year, and part of the display will be outside, making it easier to distance and to take pressure off our customers.

Small paperweight pumpkins start at $26.00 during the sale. This is one of the very best prices for handmade pieces of high quality.

Paperweight pumpkins by Parker Stafford

Blown pumpkins start at $45.00 and goes up to $50.00, $60.00, and $70.00 as my price points for this event.

Pumpkins will be both opaque and transparent. Some will be solid, others will have multiple colors. Since seeing is believing, I will let the pieces speak for themselves.

The event will be at our studio which is located at 8685 Virginia Avenue, Newport, Virginia, 24128. The studio is located in Newport, which is about six miles west of Blacksburg. We are about an hour from the state line between Virginia and West Virginia. You can see our location on our handy map below. You can get all of my vital information from my Facebook business page here:

https://m.facebook.com/staffordartglass

You can also follow the page if you like what I do and stay abreast of new work, events, drawings (yes I have about one each month there), and other opportunities (coupon codes for the website for one). If that sounds good to you, head on over and get social with the growing community of enthusiasts of all things S.A.G..

If you have questions about our event or our work, you can comment and someone will get back to you soon.

The sales event starts September 25th and continues for a week. Our prices are some of the best for work of this caliber, so when you buy our work you are getting prices that are hard to find elsewhere for handmade in the U.S.A. (and not cheap imports).

I hope to see you there!

Art and Design, Creativity, glassblowing, sculpture

Upcoming Work For 2020


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Photo By Chris Risch

There is a lot in the works for this Spring at Stafford Art Glass. We just finished up a very busy and successful Fall season designing new work such as suncatchers we call Orbitals, ornaments, some new bowl designs as well as Christmas trees, which were a snuck-up-from-behind hit this year.

We had an incredible response to our class offerings, namely pumpkins and ornaments, which many folks in the area came to participate in.

I have taken off January in order to get some much needed work done around the studio, including building pedestals for the gallery, and designing a new glass reheating mini furnace. I am also getting caught up on a writing project that has been on the drawing board for a number of years. This isn’t glass or art related, but I have managed to make some headway, and that is a good thing!

Plywood for pedestals is clamped for a final precision cut prior to assembly.
Rough assembly of a large pedestal.
Wheels have arrived for our mini-furnace!

I have new redesigns of an old favorite from the Fiamma Series, which will be interesting to see.

I will be making yard and garden ornaments in time for Spring.

I am going to set up a new class online, a class on making your own bowl. You will be able to find that class later in the Spring at Stafford Art Glass. See you there!

Stay glassy, friends! Stop by our Facebook page to see some of our newest news and to get a dose of inspiration!

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Glass Cleaning Tips


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I clean a lot of glass in my work, and whether it’s my blown glass that I’m getting spotless for a show, event, or customer, or whether it’s getting the shelves on which the work is to be displayed, getting glass clean has become both science and art. I thought I’d pass along a few tips for cleaning glass that I have found indispensable. 
First, forget glass cleaners. That’s right, forget them. I’m sorry to say that while the rest of the world is using Windex glass cleaner, I have long since given up on this product for a far superior product that is more effective and, gasp! Cheaper!
Glass cleaners do clean glass. The problem with cleaners like Windex is that they contain polish and this always leaves a film behind. If you want a cleaner that gets right to it and leaves no residue, buy a gallon of distilled white vinegar. It cuts grease and dirt and leaves no residue once all dirt and grease are dissolved. The nice thing is that vinegar is an excellent degreaser and I have been using it exclusively as a cleaner for my glass as well as my kitchen counter tops and surfaces. The advantage here is that there are no more chemicals or dyes and the cleaner is as hypoallergenic as you can get. 
Remember to get distilled white vinegar since this has no residue from the fruits used to make it (like Apple cider vinegar has).

A Magic Material

Next on the list is not even a cleaner per se, but a material that cuts down significantly on your use of vinegar in the first place. This wonder is called a microfiber cloth
Microfiber came into vogue over a decade ago, and once I was given one by an exhibitor with whom I shared some technical information with (as a kind thank-you), I became a believer in its ability to spit-shine my glass…..without the spit!  If you haven’t used microfiber yet, you should, because it can greatly reduce the need to use ANY cleaning fluids on mildly mussed glass. 
The fibers pick up dirt extremely well and lock the dirt in the fibers. Just remember to give your cloths a good cleaning with mild soap and a vinegar rinse every so often. It is good for dozens of cleanings of window panes, metal objects, or just about anything shiny (do be careful with plastics, love, as they can be mildly abrasive to them). Just bear in mind, microfiber will work only on dirt films on glass and is not designed to sop up big spills. For that, I offer the towel, be it paper or terry cloth.
If you bring these two simple ingredients into your arsenal of cleaning, you will find your world cleaner without the need of the expense of the vast cornucopia of chemistry now under your kitchen sink. 
I hope that you have had a marvelous holiday, and if things are in need of a little cleaning, I hope you will give my suggestions a try. My work here is done. Godspeed and good morrow, my dear glass enthusiasts!