Art and Design

Art and Design, glassblowing

American Glass Manufacturers Under Fire


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This just in…..this article is from Architectural Glass Arts.  I am including the article in its entirety for all who might be concerned about over reach of regulation from up on high.  Spread the word. -Parker

SOURCE LINK:

http://us1.campaign-archive1.com/?u=6b0adb646b23845dc5f96fed3&id=3a40357fe1


 

Advocate for Glass Art
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If you’ve been following the news in the glass world…

You already know that Spectrum Glass is halting production and going out of business in the next few months. Uroboros Glass in Portland will be picking up production of the System 96 product line. However, the situation in Portland is growing out of control with knee jerk reactions to some sensationalist journalism not based on science, but based in fear and speculation. Production at Bullseye Glass is being suspended with the prohibition of use of the heavy metals necessary to produce colored glass.

There are a handful of glass manufacturers in the US who are being forced to introduce expensive equipment into their manufacturing process without a clear and reasonable timeline for implementing these procedures. If you would like to contact your Representatives in Washington to let them know that the glass art industry is a precious part of the US economy that we don’t want to see disappear due to unreasonable regulations, a sample letter is below. Feel free to change it up. If you’d like to learn more about the situation, there is a group on Facebook dedicated to Glass Artists for Air Quality.

To find your Senator: http://www.senate.gov/senators/contact/
To find your Representative: http://www.house.gov/representatives/find/

Dear Senator or Representative,
This week Spectrum Glass in Washington announced that after 40 years of producing colored art glass they will be closing their doors in July. They are the main American manufacturer of many types of colored art glass. This affects an estimated 30,000 Stained Glass, Fused Glass and Glass Blowing Artists, Stores, Art Studios and Hobbyists across America. Fortunately, arrangements have been made for Uroboros Glass in Oregon state to take over production of some of their Art Glass Product line. But there is still a huge problem threatening the American Art Glass Community.
The entire U.S. art glass industry is now being evaluated by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) with respect to potential new regulations. Spectrum is the first to announce it’s closure, but other glass producing companies are also evaluating their options. Uroboros Glass has suspended production of two-thirds of their glass while EPA re-evaluates their standards. Long-standing interpretations of air quality regulations are being reevaluated, and if new regulations are applied to our industry, it would require substantial capital expenses. Spectrum Glass Company has operated well within existing environmental guidelines and has been the only stained glass manufacturer to employ baghouse technology on furnace exhaust. Still, they have already accrued extraordinary, unanticipated expenses since the start of the EPA evaluation and cannot withstand additional investments of an unknown scale. These business collapses will have a ripple effect across the country.
What you need to know:
  • The stained and colored glass industry is a small, but home grown American manufacturing phenomenon. It’s unique in the world, provides steady manufacturing jobs for American workers, and is an exporting industry as well.
  • This industry of just six manufacturers is facing $2.5-3.5 million of capital investment due to regulatory changes with no advance warning. This investment may prove too much for several of them to bear.
  • Government intervention is needed for them to meet the goals of the new regulations in such a short time frame.
  • The industry is willing to meet new regulations, but it needs reasonable time to do so.
  • The manufacturers are all owned by single individuals and their families, who work daily at their plants. They don’t have the resources of publicly traded corporations to simply pay up and move on.
  • These manufacturers supply thousands of other businesses and craftsmen who depend on their unique glass styles to complete their work. They are now at risk of being put out of work themselves.
  • The very suppliers who have created the iconic glass of the American stained glass legacy are at risk due to this situation.
  • There is currently no actual verification that the glass industry is connected to the detected toxins. EPA did moss testing, a new science, which raised public concern. They retested and found the levels to be safe. The current EPA review and imposed freeze of production is all based in fear not fact.
I want to protect the environment, but I do not want to crush an American Art Industry on assumed causation.

Please do whatever you can to prevent the loss of small businesses, jobs and and entire art form. The American Art Glass community needs your help.

Regards,
Your Name

Copyright © 2016 Architectural Glass Arts, All rights reserved.

 

Art and Design

A World OF Delicious (FREE) Digital Content


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00094701
Vincent van Gogh (Dutch, 1853 – 1890) Irises, 1889, Oil on canvas 74.3 × 94.3 cm (29 1/4 × 37 1/8 in.), 90.PA.20 The J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles

Museums today are in a state of rapid change.  Many are facing the reality that in order to reach larger numbers of people, their model for making content available is going to need to change.  Museums are now making access to imagery of works within their collections easier.  This is now a global phenomenon. As a result, many museums are making their content available in an open and free way (to use) to those who view their web sites.  The image that I have used of Vincent Van Gogh’s Irises is owned by the Getty Museum in California.  The image of that painting is available for personal and professional use. Some museums have NO limit to how the images are used, while others have some restrictions, such as unlimited noncommercial use.  To find out the specifics, you will need to read the fine print.  The rule to remember is that artwork by an artist is part of the public domain once the artist has been deceased for 70 years or more from today’s date.  You will need to know this information before publicly sharing an image. you may also have to provide attribution if you use the image publicly (meaning where the image comes from, the location of the museum, the arts, the medium, and perhaps it’s dimensions and date of creation).  Some museums have begun offering their image licenses free of charge through a movement called the creative commons zero which grants anyone who uses proper attribution of their images free use of the artwork image.

To assist you in this effort, I am including a list of links to a variety of museums world-wide who have open content.  A sampling of them:

The National Gallery of Art in Washington D.C.
Located in L.A. County California
https://www.metmuseum.org/ (Use search acronym OASC for the copyright-free stuff) Located in NYC.
https://www.clevelandart.org/open-access (this link takes you to the information page for their digital content)
https://www.artic.edu/image licensing (this link will take you to the Institute’s information page on creative commons and their policy on use of their images).  Page for the Art Institute of Chicago.
https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org The downloading process is a little cumbersome, so go here to read about how to download the images (which are worth it we think): https://www.about.biodiversitylibrary.org/ufaqs/how-do-i-dowmload-a-single-page-high-resolution-image/ You can also see the images that they have uploaded to Flickr, the image hosting website here https://www.flickr.com/photos/biodivlibrary/albums/page1
https://collections.lacma.org. Search public domain images on their site to be taken to their collection of them.
https://collections.tepapa.govt.nz. This is the for the Museum of New Zealand.
https://www.parismuseecollections.paris.fr/fr. This link is for the public entity that oversees all of the public museums in Paris France.  It is here that you will be able to navigate through the museums and galleries that are part of the public system. From the Homepage, select advanced search (recherche avancée). Then select the free images only filter (image libre de droit seulement) then enter your search terms.
British Museums have stridently resisted opening up their content for public use.  We wish this weren’t the case, considering just how much material they looted from Greece and Rome and Egypt, but I suppose time will work its magic on them and they will eventually come around.
Art and Design

Insurance For Artists


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The market for insurance that caters to the arts community has been shaken up by the economic shocks that have taken place over the last seven years or so.  Many old companies that were old stand-by’s are gone.

As an artist, you can always talk to a conventional insurance provider to get you the kind of insurance you might need for an open studio event, a show, or for ongoing insurance to provide you with the niche coverage you need to protect you from loss. Right?

It is nice to have someone who understands you. This is why I am happy to provide you with a great company that understands the needs of artists from different media.  Many artists are already using this great company and the fees are affordable for event coverage.  The name of the company is ACT Insurance, which stands for Artists Crafters & Tradesmen.

The company has two main choices  the artists can choose from: event coverage and ongoing policy coverage.  And as you might expect from a company like this, they understand that insurance for us often needs to be non-site specific, which is nice.

I suggest that your read through their list of exclusions before deciding on moving forward.  If you do sculpture that is part of an installation process, for example, ACT wont cover you. The nice thing is that their web site is very easy to navigate and you can go through their information quickly.  You can call them at 888.568.0548 and you can click to them here:   Insurance For Artists

Here’s to a great new year!

Art and Design, glassblowing

New Year (Glass) Wishes


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Orbit Slice Copyright

Over the last few years I have been taking photographs of my glass and finding that the more I zoom into the work, the more interesting the landscapes are that I get.  This is a process that believe it or not does not involve any post-production manipulation like filters or special effects. Everything that you see is as the camera saw it.  The difference for me with many of my pictures is HOW I choose to shoot the work.  Again, this is using direct sunlight, no special effects of any kind.  The key has been how I shoot the work, the lenses I use, the light I have and the object that I am photographing.  In my case, I have determined that some work photographs better than others in this way.

As we near a new year, I am reflecting a little on some of the pieces that came about this past year and I thought I would share some with you.  These are just a few of them.


 

Deep Orbit 2 Copyright

 

Some of my pictures look like surreal landscapes, maybe even from another world.  This is due to the fact that I am giving people a view into glass that most people do not see.  I am shooting glass objects at a high degree of magnification and under very high resolution.  As a result, I might turn a half-inch square into a 72 inch square.  Under these conditions, levels of detail emerge that the naked eye simply may never see.  In other cases, I am not photographing quit this tightly.  In this case, the glass will most often LOOK more like….glass.

Orbital Landscape Copyright

I like both ends of this spectrum and I have shot thousands of photographs now using my own blown glass as a subject.  You might wonder what I am trying to achieve.  Its a good question. In the beginning, I had no idea where the work was going.  I was photographing my work because a friend had sent me some photographs she took of some of my orbs up close. They were high resolution.  I blew one up and kept blowing it up until I realized that the lens she used continued to give good resolution of the glass surface.  This got me thinking and exploring.  I still am not sure where this type of work is going, except that I like it and I am going to continue doing it.  Something interesting happens when you allow yourself to not know where something is headed; it is suddenly free to go anywhere….even places you had never considered before.

From 0862-2Copyright

As I get older, technique does not dazzle me as much as it used to.  Its important, don’t get me wrong, its just that there is more to artistry than just technique. Sometimes our biggest problems lie in what we are unable to imagine….because we have limited ourselves creatively too much.  I see this all the time in school where people want to play it safe and get a good grade. The real fun is out on a limb, never sure when you might plop down on the ground.  Its there, on that limb, that the good fruit is nearly always plucked.

So often I find I am limited by my own biases of what I think I should be doing or that I am capable of doing that I literally squeeze out vast tracks of possibilities in my creative life.  As artists, we have to do this in order to create work that is coherent and focused, but this is a sword with two sides.  I use this work to keep me with something new and different running in the background.  And really, does it need to be anything?  After all, what are most of the “beautiful” materials in the world but a deep visceral reaction to things that are shiny, brilliant and brightly colored? When we say “eye candy” this is what we mean.

IMG_0876Copyright

Often “eye candy” gets smeared with a sense of vacuity though, as though this feeds the eye but not the soul. I am not entirely sure that this is so. In fact, I think that our need for great color and brilliance is so total that we could probably look at these kinds of things and be fed at a deep level.  In fact, this is just what we do when we look at a cut diamond, or a shiny metal surface.  What I am saying is that we ought not feel bad for loving the simple pleasure of a brilliant color.  After all, art emulates nature, and what we see in my glass is what we also see in nature, and it is that very nature that has informed our likes and dislikes.

Vertical Orbit Full resized Copyright

I find that when I am creating this work, I am an explorer.  I am seeking to see how far into the glass I can go to see what there is to see, to even go beyond the eye and its capacity to see the ordinary in order to pluck something from it that is extraordinary.  These are interesting pieces in their own right, and as they continue to emerge in an ever-interesting array of new forms and landscapes, I remain engaged in seeing where it will take me. Oh, and Happy New Year, everyone!  Here’s hoping that 2016 is a great year!Thanks for all your support!